Friday’s Weekly Round-Up – 348

Reposting and restating last week’s big news – “Howl’,  a newly-assembled red vinyl  box-set will be available soon – next month – from Craft Recordings.  February 23 is slated as the release-date. Hold your breath!

A couple of weeks back,  Chris Agg uploaded a scattering of short Beat-related video-clips onto You Tube. See here (a few selected examples). We start off with Lawrence Ferlinghetti reading his prose-poem “Look Homeward, Jack – Two Correspondences”  from the book Wild Dreams of A New Beginning. (Ferlinghetti can also be seen here, reading “Constantly Rising Absurdity”, from A Coney Island of the Read More

Allen Ginsberg – Richland College reading – part 2

Allen Ginsberg’s 1980 Richland College reading – continuing from yesterday

AG: So I would say now move on to.. 1956- moving on from 1956 to 1976. I have a series of poems which will require some music also – “Father Death Blues” – if we can get together on the stage –

My father died in 1976 in midsummer and I wrote a series of poems while he was alive because I spent a lot of time with him during the previous..during the winter that he was wasting, He was quite old and not in pain because it was a … Read More

Allen Ginsberg Reading at St Marks Poetry Project 1977

[Allen Ginsberg and Robert Lowell, St Mark’s Church, February 23, 1977. Photo: Martin Wechselblatt]

We featured one, from the extraordinary trove of recordings of Allen readings, last week, from PennSound (from the Robert Creeley collection – 1971 at Intersection, San Francisco). Here‘s another, six years later- from the St Mark’s Poetry Project in New York. The occasion was a now-legendary coupling of Allen Ginsberg and Robert Lowell (it was on this occasion that Lowell was memorably heckled by Gregory Corso). Allen reads a variety of works, referencing his recent visit to Australia, his Vajrayana Buddhist Read More

Studs Terkel Interviews Allen Ginsberg and Philip Glass on WFMT, Chicago 1990 – part 2

 
Philip Glass – Photograph by Allen Ginsberg – Kiev Restaurant, NYC, 1993 – Photo  c. Allen Ginsberg Estate

continuing from yesterday

ST: Resuming with Allen Ginsberg and Philip Glass, poet (and) composer working together. We heard just a piece of the very haunting “Satyagraha – the Evening Song“, earlier, that opened the Lyric Opera season. It was a pip of an opening. Critics and audience both (raved). That was three years ago… Liquid Days?  (Songs from) Liquid Days) is what?

PG: Well, it’s a collection of songs I did. In a way, it’s kind of … Read More

Basil Bunting’s Lectures on Poetic Origins – 2 (The One-Eyed Ford)

Student: Is the “one-eyed Ford” something you just made up now?
AG: No , the “one-eyed Ford” is a  famous American-Indian twentieth-century.. It’s a great line! – It’s one of the great lines in America .. of the, as-yet, unacademicized poetry. The many many versions of the “one-eyed Ford” song (South-West – Oklahoma, actually – I heard it last year… last heard it (with Harry Smith) in Anadarko,  Oklahoma) – “My one-eyed Ford”! – It’s a great … Read More

Expansive Poetics – 3 (Aboriginal Introduction)

AG: So for this [Naropa class on Expansive Poetics]. I thought I’d bring in a little bit of material that is extraneous, but is considered precursor. This is from Geza Roheim‘s “Children of the Desert“ (concerning) the Western tribes of Central Australia. So this is the only ancient poem that I’ll introduce. [Allen begins reading from anthropologist Roheim’s text] –  “The crowd of women that he had seen in the distance arrived and he had intercourse with every one of them. The man who arose from the ceremonial pole went right into the earth and became a … Read More

Spontaneous Poetics – 101 (Australia – 2)

[Tutuma Tjapangati (19o9-1987) – One Old Man’s Dreaming (1971)]

Student: Did the Aborigine’s have, (as) a Creation Myth, that they originally came from New Guinea, or is New Guinea just a h(e)aven [sic] for hearts and souls ?

AG: Well, this is Northern Australia. There were about, I think I read somewhere, three-thousand different Aboriginal languages spoken. So each tribe had its own dialect, some of them completely different so that one tribe couldn’t understand another. Originally (before Englishmen came to Australia), they lived in the lusher parts of (the country). It wasn’t total desert. But Australia is … Read More

Spontaneous Poetics 100 – (Australia – 1)

[Wandjuk Marika (1927-1987)]

AG: Phil Whalen began with some basic poetics, as far as I understand. I looked over his notes.  [Allen had been called away and had handed his class over to Philip Whalen & others – He returns here, to continue with the class, July 23, 1976]

[A brief excerpt from the following transcription has already appeared on The Allen Ginsberg Project – see here]

[Original transcriber’s note – “This lecture is recorded at a great distance from the speaker, resulting in some difficulty obtaining a correct transcription”]

AG: Can you hear me? Raise your hand if … Read More