Basil Bunting’s Birthday

[“Basil Bunting and Allen Ginsberg in Tom and Connie Pickard’s flat, Jesmond, Newcastle upon Tyne, 22 May, 1965.]

Today is Basil Bunting‘s birthday.

We feature a guest posting today from poet and Bunting editor and scholar, Don Share

On Thursday, March 1, 1900, Basil Bunting was born in Scotswood-on-Tyne in the north of England. Bunting’s life extended through a large part of the twentieth century, beginning just as Queen Victoria’s long reign was nearing its end, and ending in 1985, the year the first mobile phone network in the UK was established and the internet Domain Name System was … Read More

Dylan Thomas Centenary

 

[Dylan Thomas (1914-1953)]

October 27 – The Dylan Thomas’ Centenary – One hundred years ago on this day…
Allen Ginsberg-Dylan Thomas. Here’s Allen’s account, “Late April 1952” from Journals, Early Fifties, Early Sixties of a booze-fueled (natch!) brief-but-frustrating encounter. Allen was 26 and Thomas 37. Thomas would be dead by November the following year.. 
 

“Left Dylan Thomas and someone else with a big bruise on right forehead – thin mediocre type – in cab on 6th Avenue, 15 minutes ago. I was in San Remo sitting relaxed towards closing time when they walked in. I only half-recognized him

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March 1 Birthdays – Lucien Carr & Basil Bunting

Basil Bunting

[Basil Bunting (1900-1985)]

[Lucien Carr (1925-2005)]

Two strangely contrasting birthdays, celebrated today (strangely contrasting? – or maybe not). We’ll draw your attention to fairly comprehensive initial postings on each of our two subjects of study – Basil Bunting – here  and Lucien Carr – here First, the latter. Due to the success of Kill Your Darlings, (out in America on DVD later this month), from a quiet unassuming back-seat, Lucien, (at least in the Dane DeHaan version), has been catapaulted to, clearly unwanted and unsought for, global notoriety, slandered (the movies can do this, even if it is just … Read More

Spontaneous Poetics – 70 (Gerard Manley Hopkins)

[Gerard Manley Hopkins (1844-1889)]
Allen Ginsberg’s June 30 1976 Spontaneous Poetics class continues
Student: Allen..
AG: Yes?
Student: Would you say (something about) … more older forms.. ?
[the tape breaks off here, but resumes, shortly thereafter, with Allen in mid-sentence]
AG …with measure to the normal spoken speech of Shakespearean England. I haven’t had that speech in my ear, actually, for real. I just heard it in the artifact of poetry. I assume it must have arisen originally out of some native tongue, but I don’t know (because they were messing around a lot with trying to adapt classical … Read More