Friday’s Weekly Round-Up – 247

From the audio-visual archives of RTBF, Belgium’s public-broadcasting organization for the French-speaking community, this delightful footage of Allen (and Peter Orlovsky and Steven Taylor) in Belgium in 1983. Following a short introduction, Allen and company are glimpsed (briefly) walking the streets (of Liege) and then Allen is interviewed (speaking en francais!). Allen and Steven get down at the piano (sic – yes, really) to perform “Father Death Blues”  and Allen-in-Austria footage (at the Schule Fur Dichtung/Vienna Poetry Academy – who is that woman sitting across from him at the table at the beginning?) – “I’ll begin with music. Inspiration … Read More

Friday’s Weekly Round-Up – 243

 

          [Allen Ginsberg’s 437 East 12th Street, New York City kitchen (looking out on the corridor/hallway), November 1987 – Photograph by Gordon Ball – (images of Rimbaud, Trungpa and Whitman visible on the wall)] 

 

We’re a little behind “Our Allen” with this stuff, but wanted to share with you a few more of Randy Roark‘s treasure-trove of old Allen pages

 

His observations on these two:  “By popular demand, this is the other poem I photocopied from Allen’s notebooks so he could take it on an airplane and decode the words I couldn’t decipher. It was … Read More

Friday’s Weekly Round-Up – 241

 

The European Beat Studies Network’s Annual Conference next week. This year – in Brussels. Among the explicitly Ginsberg-centric presentations: the whole first (Wednesday morning) opening panel – “Cross-Fertilizations From East & West – 1 – Searching For Which Ginsberg Legacy?” (chaired by Jaap Van Der Bent)Robert Holton on “Ginsberg’s Performative “Howl”, Trevor Carolan – “Asian Wisdom Traditions, Ecological Poetics and Allen Ginsberg”, Paul McDonald – “Cosmopolitan Comedy – Allen Ginsberg’s Humour and the Challenge to Superiority Theory”, and Franca Bellarsi – “Ginsberg as Mediator Between Anglophone and Francophone Poetry” – and, that afternoon, (on the “Cross-Fertilization between … Read More

Lawrence Ferlinghetti’s Elegy to Allen Ginsberg

The Ginsberg-Ferlinghetti Letters, “I Greet You at the Beginning of a Great Career”, published this past summer by City Lights, concludes with a reprint of Lawrence’s moving elegy to his friend (from 1997) – “Allen Ginsberg Dying”.  We reprint it once again here ALLEN GINSBERG DYING Allen Ginsberg is dying It’s all in the papers It’s on the evening news A great poet is dying But his voice won’t die His voice is on the land In Lower Manhattan in his own bed he is dying There is nothing to do about it He is dying the death … Read More

Friday’s Weekly Round-Up – 235

Featuring shots last week from 1967’s fabled Human Be-In. Here’s another one – from Lisa Law

[Allen Ginsberg, Human Be-In Golden Gate Park, 1967- Photograph © Lisa Law]

and here’s Lisa Law’s famous ecstatic one

[Allen Ginsberg, Human Be-In, Golden Gate Park, 1967- Photograph © Lisa Law]

And here’s a couple more from the generous and talented Lisa

[Allen Ginsberg, Human Be-In, Golden Gate Park, 1967- Photograph © Lisa Law]

[Allen Ginsberg, Human Be-In, Golden Gate Park, 1967- Photograph © Lisa Law]

[Allen Ginsberg, Human Be-In, Golden Gate Park, 1967- Photograph © Lisa Law]

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Friday’s Weekly Round-Up – 233

 

Jack Kerouac on Allen Ginsberg. We’ve been featuring Ginsberg on Kerouac, but here‘s a pretty candid Kerouac-on-Ginsberg notebook entry.   Jack writes: “Ginsberg – intelligent enuf – interested in the outward appearance and pose of great things, intelligent enuf to know where to find them, but once there he acts like Jerry Newman [sic] the photographer anxious to be photographed photographing. Ginsberg wants to run his hands up the backs of people, for this he gives and seldom takes – He is also a mental screwball – *(Tape recorder anxious to be tape recorded tape recording) (like Seymour Read More

Friday’s Weekly Round-Up – 232

A great spirited reading of the Moloch section of “Howl(from circa 1989) on the CBS News Nightwatch program  – “Well, it’s the climax and actually the definition of the poem” declares Allen.  “What sphinx of cement and aluminum bashed open their skulls and ate up their brains and imagination?/Moloch! Solitude! Filth! Ugliness! Ashcans and unobtainable dollars..” – Reaction shot(s) from fellow-guest Christopher Buckley (William Buckley‘s son) and a seemingly unfazed host

Here’s an intriguing little memoir (from back in 2012 – don’t know how we missed it) of Allen-at-Columbia and the early days –

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Creeley on Kerouac (Doctor Sax)

 

         [Robert Creeley (1926-2005)]

Last month we featured transcription of Clark Coolidge on Jack Kerouac from a 1982 Naropa panel that also featured Robert Creeley and Warren Tallman. The occasion was the 25th year anniversary of Kerouac’s On The Road  and this particular panel focused on specific texts. Coolidge’s was Old Angel Midnight, Creeley’s was Doctor Sax.  Here is a transcription of Creeley’s remarks. Following brief introductory remarks by Larry Fagin, Creeley (at approximately two-and-three-quarter minutes in) begins: Robert Creeley: Thank you Larry, and Allen (Ginsberg), and all of the dear people that have brought this to … Read More

Friday’s Weekly Round-Up – 230

 

Yesterday was Diane Di Prima‘s 81st birthday. Here’s the extraodinary class she gave last May (with Professor Steven Goodman) at the California Institute of Integral Studies – in two parts, here and here 

Earlier Diane Di Prima birthday shout-outs on the Allen Ginsberg Project here, here, and here

Here‘s a two-part story on another prominent Italian-American – Lawrence Ferlinghettihere and here and  an excerpt from his forthcoming book Writing Across The Landscape (a further excerpt may be found – here)

& keeping the Italian theme, Gregory Corso’s Gasoline appears in

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The Ginsberg-Ferlinghetti Letters

 

The phrase is, of course, Emerson‘s, writing to congratulate Walt Whitman

 I greet you at the beginning of a great career, which yet must have had a long foreground somewhere for such a start. I rubbed my eyes a little to see if this sunbeam were no illusion; but the solid sense of the book is a sober certainty. It has the best merits, namely of fortifying and encouraging..”

This greeting was echoed by Lawrence Ferlinghetti after hearing Allen’s legendary Gallery Six reading of “Howl” in October of 1955 –  “I GREET YOU AT THE BEGINNING OF

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