Friday’s Weekly Round-Up – 333

Next week in Paris (September 20-22) sees the sixth Annual Conference of the European Beat Studies Network –  “The Transcultural Beat Generation”  is this year’s focus “(Collaboration. Publication, Translation)”.  The three days are broken down as follows: Wednesday, the 20th – “French Edition(s) and Beat Intellectual Life in Paris” – Thursday, the 21st – “Beat Translation and Collaboration” – Friday the 22nd – “Marginalized Beat Artists”.

Of the specifically Ginsbergian – Thursday-evening (6-7.30) has been given over to a panel on Allen, chaired by Anna Aublet) – (rather unfortunately, it clashes with a panel on William Burroughs (chaired by … Read More

Friday Weekly Round-Up – 285

 

“Self-Portrait on my Seventieth birthday in Borsolino hat and black cashmere-silk scarf from Milan & Dublin Thornproof-tweed suit, Oleg Cassini tie from Goodwill, shirt same source, kitchen windwo mid-day, I stayed home & worked on Selected Poems 1947-95 proofs after returning from Walker Art Center reading – Beat exhibition weekend. Monday June 3, 1996, NY. photo c. Allen Ginsberg Estate

We Are Continually Exposed to the Flashbulb of Death – The Photographs of Allen Ginsberg (1953-1996), the show that originated in 2014 at the University of Toronto, (see here for more on their pre-eminent Ginsberg photo collection), opened … Read More

Friday’s Weekly Round-Up – 215

 

Next week (next Tuesday) is  Hal Willner’s LA “Howl” extravaganza.

The following day is Earth Day – courtesy WNYC’s Spinning on Air, in New York, at The Greene Space  there’ll be an Earth Day Special with Patti Smith, Anne Waldman, Laurie Anderson and others – A live web-cast of the event will be available here.    The following day –  Thursday April the 9th – (for all you poètes maudits) is Charles Baudelaire‘s birthday.

Tomorrow (April the 4th)  Chogyam Trungpa‘s Parinirvana.

This Sunday at City Lights, Marc Olmsted reads (in honor … Read More

Refrain

 

[Eric Drooker – illustration for The Ballad of the Skeletons, as it appeared in The Nation, October 23, 2012]

More Lion For Real amplification.  More early Ginsberg lyrics  – today’s offering – Refrain

To hear his 1989 version, see here Sleeve note:  “Among the earliest writings in this suite, echoing late Yeats style. “Shadow changes into bone,” was my Kerouackian motto, 1948, intending to say that eternal prophetic poetic intuition (shadow) will turn out to be real (bone). Having heard (William) Blakes voice I was headed for the booby-hatch for a season. Michael BlairRead More

Complaint Of The Skeleton to Time

Continuing with our re-visit and amplification of the Willner-Minzer  Lion For Real – see here, here, here and here

1997 - The Lion For Real

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

here‘s another early (1949) lyric – “Complaint Of The Skeleton To Time”

Sleeve note – “1949 lyric influenced by Thomas Wyatt’s “My Lute, Awake!“ & Wm Butler Yeats‘ “Crazy Jane” – part of The Shrouded Stranger of the Night concept conceived same time as (Jack) Kerouac’s Dr Sax. Gary Windo‘s free jazz sounds a variant of drunken Mexican Day of the DeadRead More

Ginsberg – Scribble

[Kenneth Rexroth  & Edith Piaf]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here‘s the very first poem that opens “The Lion For Real”  (published in Reality Sandwiches) – Kenneth Rexroth and Edith Piaf – a brief but poignant lyric, Scribble     

Steve Swallow‘ s on piano, Michael Blair on guitar, Ralph Carney on clarinet. Allen’s sleeve note – “Casual note, a long melancholic affectionate 1956 thought about the late irascible Bay Area anarchist Poet, Kenneth Rexroth, might be 4 A.M. in the soul that Michael Blair’s music mirrors”

Scribble 
Rexroth’s face reflecting human            tired bliss … Read More

The Shrouded Stranger (Three Renditions)

The Shrouded Stranger

Last weekend we featured two tracks from the Michael Minzer-Hal Willner-produced Lion For Real – “To Aunt Rose” and “Lion For Real”, this weekend, a couple more –  First, the very early lyric (from 1949) –  “The Shrouded Stranger” Shadow Death From Nowhere.jpg

The Shrouded Stranger Bare skin is my wrinkled sack

When hot Apollo humps my back
When Jack Frost grabs me in these rags
I wrap my legs with burlap bags
 
My flesh is cinder my face is snow
I walk the railroad to and fro
When city streets are black and dead
The railroad embankment is my bed… Read More

The Lion For Real – (Three Renditions)

Another from Michael Minzer and Hal Willner’s The Lion For Real – the title track. The musicians on this one – Arto Lindsay, guitar, Michael Blair, guitar (& glockenspiel), Gary Windo, tenor sax,  Rob Wasserman, bass, Beaver Harris, drums – sound effects by Richard Fussco. Allen’s sleeve note:  [“Soyez muette pour moi, contemplative Idole”] – “Be mute for me, Contemplative idol’, epigram from Tristan Corbiere‘s last stanza, “Rhapsody of a Deaf Man”.[“Rhapsodie du sourd“] –  Retrospective account of a “mystical experience” 1948 described elsewhere (Paris Review Interviews – Writers at Work … Read More

To Aunt Rose – (Three Renditions)

One of Allen’s most accomplished early poems is our spotlight today – “To Aunt Rose” –   “A memory flash 1958 Paris. My favorite Aunt Rose (1900-1940) took care of me weekends when my mother was ill – Books named are my late father Louis Ginsberg‘s. It was a big event to publish a volume of poetry in those days! –  Rose Gaidemak died of septicemia..” This audio is taken from a reading at San Francisco State University’s Poetry Center on April 27, 1959. It was written in 1958 and published in 1961, included as part of the collection, … Read More

What Keeps Mankind Alive?

What Keeps Mankind Alive? The text – Ralph Manheim and John Willett‘s translation, from Bertolt Brecht‘s original German, of the second finale of Brecht-Weill’s classic “Threepenny Opera” (Die Dreigroschenoper) (1928):

A rare photograph of Brecht and Weill together

[Bertolt Brecht (1898-1956) & Kurt Weill (1900-1950)]

“You gentlemen who think you have a mission/To purge us of the seven deadly sins/Should first sort out the basic food position/Then start your preaching, that’s where it begins/ You lot, who preach restraint and watch your waist as well/Should learn, for once, the way the world is run/However much you twist, or whatever lies that you tell/Food is the first … Read More