Friday’s Weekly Round-Up – 289

bob-dylan-net-worth

Bob Dylan and Allen Ginsberg, San Francisco, 1965, photo c. Larry Keenan

Yesterday’s announcement of Bob Dylan winning the Nobel Prize still has us reeling. Better late than never,  Allen’s letter to the Nobel Committee, from November 20, 1996 (sic):

“Dear Members of the Swedish Academy,  For the Nobel Prize in Literature I propose Bob Dylan. Bob Dylan is a American Bard & minstrel of XX Century, whose words have influenced many generations throughout the world. He deserves a Nobel Prize in recognition of his mighty & universal poetic powers”

Sincerely, Allen Ginsberg, Poet, Member of American Academy of Arts … Read More

Friday’s Weekly Round-Up – 288

 

October 7, 1849 –  the death of Edgar Allan Poe. More Allen-Ginsberg-on-Poe postings here, here and here

October 2017 marks the Centennial of the English poet David Gascoyne. Enitharmon, his English publisher, have taken the occasion to reprint a 1986 letter/memoir/note he wrote to Allen – See here

October in the Railroad Earth – October is Kerouac month… (every month is Kerouac month! – but this month (this weekend) in Lowell, Massachusetts, it’s the annual Lowell Celebrates Kerouac). Full details about the weekend’s activities – hereRead More

Friday’s Weekly Round-Up – 229

[Spiderman and Allen Ginsberg cartoon – Tom Gauld]

 

From the current issue of Poetry magazine  – more Howl parodies – (we’ve featured several such before –  –  Amy Newman – “I saw the best minds of my generation destroyed by wedding 
planners, dieting, in shapewear,/ dragging themselves in cute outfits through the freezer section for the semifreddo bender/blessed innovative cloister girl pin-ups burning to know the rabbi of electricity in poverty, obedience, in the dream stick of opium and the green Wi-Fi fuse..” From the Paris Review – “Supplication to the Muses on A Trying Day” – quite … Read More

Meditation and Poetics – 94 – Haiku – 7 (Haiku – continued)

Meeting, the two old friends laugh aloud                     In the grove, the fallen leaves are many.

Packed in and sleeping with others                          Again getting up from this night’s lodging.
The wandering poet, Basho, describing his own empty wanderings – “Packed in and sleeping with others/Again getting up from this night’s lodging”.
(R.H.) Blyth, who was the author of this, suggests a number of qualities, such as space (and) time, which are, for him, the empty subjects, so to speak, the empty subjects of haiku – selflessness, loneliness, grateful acceptance, wordlessness, non-intellectuality, contradictoriness, thus humor, freedom from conceptions, non-morality, simplicity, materiality – those are … Read More

Mediation and Poetics – 91 – Haiku – 4 – (Zhuangzi)

[Hokusai (1760-1849)  Philosopher Watching A Pair of Butterflies (1814) – plate from picture book. Museum Volkenkunde, Leiden National Museum of Ethnography]

So what I’d like to do now is read through a whole range of these, getting now into the actual haiku themselves, referring back to both (Christopher) Smart and (William) Blake’s long-line form, noticing that, in a sense, the haiku is parallel to the long-line form. The long line is only good if you’ve got a haiku in it, or you’ve got some mind-jump

“The cow comes,/moo, moo/ out of the mist”

“Yield to the willow/all

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Friday’s Weekly Round-Up – 218

                   

[Ming Hui – translation of the opening lines of Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl” into Mandarin]

from a recent interview (Q & A) in the New York Times with poet and translator, Willis Barnstone, (provocatively titled “Willis Barnstone on Translating Mao and Touring Beijing With Allen Ginsberg”):

NYT: During your stay in 1984-85, Allen Ginsberg came.

WB: Yes, he came on a visit with leading American authors. He gave a talk about [fellatio]. – [n.b. New York Times’ square-brackets and Latin terminology, not ours!] – That was the end of his tour! Everyone was stone-faced. But being Allen Ginsberg and
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Spontaneous Poetics – 139

File:Pieter Bruegel the Elder - The Tower of Babel (Vienna) - Google Art Project - edited.jpg

[Pieter Brueghel the Elder (1526-1569) – Tower of Babel (1563), oil on panel, 44.8 inches x 61 inches at the Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna, Austria]  

  AG: I wanted to find out… Let’s see.. I  took over the space just as Philip Whalen was going to discourse on the languages that he spoke – and read… I butted in. I was interested in hearing.. ((I want to) switch again, just a moment)..because, I was conscious (that), when I began my sentence about (reading) (Federico Garcia) Lorca, [editor’s note, he means Rilke] that I was answering first.  [Allen turns to … Read More

Spontaneous Poetics – 130 (Ginsberg & Whalen – Oriental Influences)

[R.H.Blyth(1898-1964)]

.

AG: There’s another book by (R.H.) Blyth called Senryu Notes Student: Called what? AG:  Senryu Notes – S-E-N-R-Y-U – Is that right?  [Senryu – Japanese Satirical Verses]Philip Whalen: Yeah, yeahAG: “Senryu” means what?

Philip Whalen: Senryu is the comical and obscene and..

AG: vulgar?

Philip Whalen: ..vulgar, that type of thing. Also, there’s a..

AG:  A two-volume history of haiku Philip Whalen: Yes, a two-volume history. Then there’s another book that’s called Oriental (Wit and) Humor [Oriental Humor], which is also..(a book of) senryu, and other jokes and song, and… (A)

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Spontaneous Poetics -103 – The Blues Intro – 1 (Blues & Ballads)

AG: Another current aspect of communal poetics that I also wanted to touch on … is an American form, which began in improvisation, basically, I’m told, an iambic pentameter line. The rhyme scheme AAA, three rhymes in a row – so it’s a triplet, a three-line verse. Usually, the first line and the second line are repeated. The origin was in, probably, unaccompanied solo, or solo with very simple instrument(s), (it’s a musical form). Does anybody recognize the form I’m talking about?

Student: The Blues

AG: Yeah. American Blues. I’ve been studying Blues for some time now, and, not being … Read More

Friday Weekly Round-Up – 128 (Whitman’s Birthday)

[Walt Whitman (1819-1892)   c.1867-70 – Unknown photographer (probably William Kurtz) via The Walt Whitman Archives]

Whitman’s birthday today!  (for Whitman-birthday celebration on The Allen Ginsberg Project see here and here)

and Allen’s birthday beckons!  (Monday June 3rd)

Howl Festival celebrations open tonight in New York, (inaugurated, as usual, with the regular“group-reading” of “Howl”, co-ordinated by poet-impresario Bob Holman (Bob Rosenthal and Eliot Katz, among those taking part in the event) – and there’ll be readings and performances taking place around the park (Tompkins Square Park) all day Saturday (more details here)

and Splab’s … Read More