Friday’s Weekly Round-Up – 290

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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834)

Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s birthday today – from Richard Holmes’ definitive biography: ” (William) Wordsworth called him “the most wonderful man” he had ever known; but many subsequent biographers have been skeptical. It would seem possible to write an entire book on Coleridge’s opium addiction, his plagiarisms, his fecklessness in marriage, his political “apostasy”, his sexual fantasies, or his radiations of mystic humbug.

And indeed, all these books have been written. But no biographer…has tried to examine his entire life in a broad and sympathetic manner, and to ask the one vital question; what … Read More

Friday’s Weekly Round-Up – 287

Wait Till I’m Dead, Allen Ginsberg’s recently-published collection of uncollected posthumous poems, (which has not had anything like the notices that it should have), recently received an attentive and intelligent review in Empty Mirror from poet-scholar Marc Olmsted  (“What we come away with is wanting more..”) – see hereDrawing attemtion to Andrzej’s Pietrasz‘s Allen Ginsberg in Poland (Andrzej’s just back from a visit to the Beats show in Paris and he brought his camera)

Jeff Nightbyrd,

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Friday Weekly Round-Up – 285

 

“Self-Portrait on my Seventieth birthday in Borsolino hat and black cashmere-silk scarf from Milan & Dublin Thornproof-tweed suit, Oleg Cassini tie from Goodwill, shirt same source, kitchen windwo mid-day, I stayed home & worked on Selected Poems 1947-95 proofs after returning from Walker Art Center reading – Beat exhibition weekend. Monday June 3, 1996, NY. photo c. Allen Ginsberg Estate

We Are Continually Exposed to the Flashbulb of Death – The Photographs of Allen Ginsberg (1953-1996), the show that originated in 2014 at the University of Toronto, (see here for more on their pre-eminent Ginsberg photo collection), opened … Read More

Friday’ s Weekly Round-Up – 284

[Allen Ruppersberg – from The Singing Posters – Allen Ginsberg’s Howl (Part 1 & 2) (2003) (detail) — from the work included in the exhibition Beat Generation – New York, San Francisco, Paris at the Centre Pompidou, Paris, France, June 22-October 3, 2016]

Jeremy Harding in the London Review of Books:

“In the Beat constellation, Allen Ginsberg’s star now shines more brightly than the rest…There would have been no Beat phenomenon without Ginsberg, logorrhoeic poet and protester, illustrious, predatory queer, inventor and supporter of colleagues and hangers-on, impresario and self-appointed hero of a tradition that he put together from all kinds … Read More

Friday’s Weekly Round-Up – 283

 

Edson cemetry, Lowell, Mass. The exact location. Bob Dylan and Allen visiting Jack Kerouac’s grave. We’ve featured Bob Egan‘s conceptual recreations – Popspots – before –  here.  Here’s his re-staging of two of Ken Regan’s iconic photos.

Here’s another of his Popspots ( “Pot Is A Reality Kick” – Benedict J Fernandez‘s much-circulated image of Allen at the LEMAR (Committee To Legalize Marijuana) protest, Christopher Street at 6th Avenue, New York City, January, 1965

 

Oscar Wilde !854-1900

Patti Smith reading Oscar Wilde in Reading Gaol ? Reading Gaol (HM Prison, Reading) … Read More

Robert Crumb’s Birthday

It’s Robert Crumb‘s Birthday. He turns 73 today.  Happy Birthday, Robert!

 

[Robert Crumb – Self-Portrait (1982)]

R. Crumb on Allen Ginsberg

 

Allen Ginsberg kissed me  once.
It was in 1989, before I knew what was going on and I couldn’t stop him, he kissed me on the mouth. [laughs]
I like Howl. Howl’s great. It’s like the beatnik manifesto of the ’50s, y’ know, it really says it all. It’s got that beatnik attitude of that time in America. It’s quite eloquent. But after that, he didn’t really do anything that struck me as
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Friday’s Weekly Round-Up – 281

                                                [Allen Ginsberg Close-Up, 1960s – Photograph by Perry Riddle]

Jonah Raskin reviews The Ginsberg 3 CD set  for the Huffington Post – here:

The Last Word on First Blues is as essential to an understanding of Ginsberg as his Collected Poems, and just as much fun. The set also shows that those who only know Ginsberg as a poet of the printed word ans not also as a performer of the spoken … Read More