Dowland Performance (“Weep ye no more, sad fountains”)

Transcription of Allen’s “Basic Poetics” class, from 1980 at Naropa, continues. The previous tape (tape 9 of 35) is missing and this tape comes in (towards the end of a class) with an in-class performance]

AG: What page is the poem  (“Weep You No More Sad Fountains” by John Dowland)
Student:  Page 115

[Editorial note – The author of this poem is, in fact, unknown, but its first recorded use was as the lyric for one of Dowland’s published lute pieces]

[Student/Musician in class plays with guitar accompaniment his own setting of  “Weep You No More…”]

Student/Musician:

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Jim Carroll workshop continues – 4

Jim Carroll workshop continues – see here, here and here 

JC: I mean, that just has..you know. Like, I mentioned before about Henry Miller – the one book.. when they ask(ed) me what books people should read for this course, I mention(ed) the  Henry Miller book,  (The) Time of the Assasins, because, I mean, simply because it made me feel like..  That was he book that made me want to get into music, you know.  I read.. 

I mean, it’s his assessment of Rimbaud – it’s really just as much his assessment of Henry Miller, of course – but I

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Jim Carroll workshop continues – 3 – (Bob Dylan)

This weekend,  following on from last weekend, transcription of  the 1980 Jim Carroll music and poetics workshop at Naropa continues.   For the two previous segments – see  here and here  

JC: And also I mean, like, people, eventually, knew where his [Bob Dylan‘s] influences were coming from, whereas they didn’t know where Lou (Reed)’s influences were coming from. Not as many people had read Delmore Schwartz as Allen Ginsberg and Rimbaud. And so, I don’t know, there were certain songs of Dylan’s which just got…I lost faith in, for a while, you know. And then … Read More

Basil Bunting’s Lectures on Poetic Origins – 4

                                   [Basil Bunting (1900-1985) – Photograph by Derek Smith] 

Allen Ginsberg’s remarks on Basil Bunting’s lectures continues – see here, here and here

AG: So Louis Zukofsky, in modern times,  was the most subtle person working with different measures and with a pure relation between musical forms and quantitative count and he was saying that the madrigal distorts words (because you’ve got several lines at once) and so words are not allowed to take whatever stress is appropriate to them in

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Basil Bunting’s Lectures on Poetic Origins – 3

                                                          [Basil Bunting (1900-1985)]

Allen Ginsberg’s remarks on Basil Bunting’s lectures continues

AG: So then, the next thing would be the comparing of the time of the steps, the time it takes for steps, or the ratio of times of the steps, to count the syllables. In..  an orderly measure in dance would be the steps, in music, it would be the notes, in poetry, the syllables. A pattern of spatial rhythms,

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Basil Bunting’s Lectures on Poetic Origins – 2 (The One-Eyed Ford)

Student: Is the “one-eyed Ford” something you just made up now?
AG: No , the “one-eyed Ford” is a  famous American-Indian twentieth-century.. It’s a great line! – It’s one of the great lines in America .. of the, as-yet, unacademicized poetry. The many many versions of the “one-eyed Ford” song (South-West – Oklahoma, actually – I heard it last year… last heard it (with Harry Smith) in Anadarko,  Oklahoma) – “My one-eyed Ford”! – It’s a great … Read More

Basil Bunting’s Lectures on Poetic Origins – 1

Basil Bunting  (1900-1985)

AG:  Some of the ideas that (Basil) Bunting was laying out, I would like to lay out here because they’re just very interesting. He was saying that, first of all, English poetry was sung up until the 17th century. All the poets wrote for singing including, of all people, John Donne! – Donne was sung. He was put to music by   a fellow named Ferrabosco of that era  (do you know anything about that?) – Well, apparently Donne was actually sung. Donne is usually taught nowadays as if he… you know.. he has one or two

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Jim Carroll Workshop – 2

JC: Well, I’m going to play a song that was a great..  one of my favorites… ..Actually, I’m going to play this early Velvet Underground song and then I’m going to play a Phil Ochs song. For some reason, Phil Ochs and The Velvet Underground have this weird connection for me. I mean. they got me into poetry as much as Bob.. well more than Bob Dylan, and as much as Frank O’Hara
[Student/technical assistant plays The Velvet Underground’s “Sunday Morning” – JC: “Yeah go ahead..just turn it up here” – Student: The … Read More

Jim Carroll Workshop – 1

                           [Jim Carroll – album cover – Catholic Boy (1980) – cover photo by Annie Liebovitz]

Beginning today, serialization of transcription of Jim Carroll’s June 30, 1986 Naropa Poetics and Music class.  [see here for Jim Carroll reading]

Larry Fagin: Ladies and gents, welcome to the second week of Naropa [July, 1986] poetry summer camp. I’m pleased tonight to have.. and honored and thrilled to have, Jim Carroll with us, who first came to light at aged fifteen, with a book called, (an) amazing book called, 

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