Greensleeves

“My Lady Greensleeves” – Dante Gabriel Rossetti  (1828-1882) – oil on panel  33 x 27.3 cms (1863) at the Fogg Art Museum (Harvard University), Cambridge, Massachusetts

AG: And has anybody ever… everybody knows Greensleeves don’t they? Has anybody ever heard all the lyrics of Greensleeves? – They’re here? – Are they in our book here? Is Greensleeves in this book? –  I think so  – It’s of the same time and from one of these Miscellanies – A Miscellany from 1584 called “A Handful of Pleasant Delights”, where Greensleeves first was printed. Is it listed in the … Read More

Terry Gross Interview, 1994

 

Terry Gross. 1987 in the studio on NPR’s “Fresh Air”

   

“I saw the best minds of my generation destroyed by madness, starving hysterical naked, dragging themselves through the negro streets at dawn, looking for an angry fix”

TG: Allen Ginsberg, reading his now classic poem “Howl”. Ginsberg was a cultural hero to several generations. He was one of the leading Beat poets in the (19)50’s, in the (19)60’s he was an icon of the counterculture, through the (19)70’s and (19)80’s, he continued to write and to explore Eastern religions. By the (19)90’s, he was an inspiration to up-and-coming … Read More

Marlowe & Raleigh (The Passionate Shepherd)

 

Abraham Bloemaert – Shepherd and Shepherdess (1627) oil on canvas – in the collection of Niedersächsisches Landesmuseum, Hannover (Germany)

AG: Does everybody here from high school remember (Christopher) Marlowe and (Walter) Raleigh‘s little complimentary poems, “The Passionate Shepherd to His Love” and “The Nymph’s Reply to the Shepherd“? Has everybody read those? – A few. Well, let’s get on to those.  [Editorial note – Earlier recordings of Allen reading those two poems can be found here] Do you want to read… Let’s start with the Marlowe. Rachel [sic], do you want to read that? … Read More

Dowland – 2 – Fine Knacks For Ladies

JOHN DOWLAND – FINE KNACKS FOR LADIES  (The Pedlar’s Song)

AG: Connected to that (“Weep You No More Sad Fountains“)  is (John Dowland‘s) “Fine Knacks  For (The) Ladies” (one page before, page 111)

[At approximately sixty-one minutes in (and concluding at approximately  sixty-two-and-three-quarter minutes in) , AG plays a recording of  John Dowland’s  “Fine Knacks For Ladies” – (“Though all my wares be trash, the heart is true” – “Sing it to Andy Warhol!” – “the orient’st pearl … Read More

Allen Ginsberg in Baltimore 1973

Allen Ginsberg at the Maryland Institute College of Art, Baltimore,  October 1973 A vintage reading today from 1973 (see here) –  Allen reads, principally, from poems that will appear in the collection, Mind Breaths

AG: (I’ve been here) pretty regularly about every third semester. So I’ve been here, I think, since the mid ‘Sixties, presenting sequentially, every alternate year, the new poetry that I’ve written in the last seasons. So that’s probably what I’ll do this time again. I was here about a year-and-a-half ago [1972]. So I’ll read poems written in the last year-and-a-half., since I was here in … Read More

Dowland – 1 – Weep You No More Sad Fountains

AG: So. Now then with some other music of Dowland  We have a couple of  (John) Dowland songs (on the tape) which are in our texts.  So, to begin with, the, the one that was set to music, the “Weep You No More, Sad Fountains“,  (that’s on)..page 113)     [From approximately fifty-six-and-a-quarter to fifty-seven-and-a-quarter minutes in, there is ambient conversation among  the students, as AG goes to set up the record –   AG: “..this is the end of the last song – Student: Turn it down a bit – AG- Turn it down?”]  [From approximately fifty-seven-and-three-quarter minutes in (to … Read More

More Rose-Cheek’d Laura

[“Only beauty purely loving/Knows no discord” (Thomas Campion)]

Continuing with classroom discussion of Campion’s “Rose-cheek’d Laura..” Rose-cheek’d Laura, come Sing thou smoothly with thy beauty’s Silent music, either other Sweetly gracing Lovely forms do flow From concent divinely framed; Heav’n is music and thy beauty’s Birth is heavenly. These dull notes we sing Discords need for helps to grace them; Only beauty purely loving Knows no discord, But still moves delight Like clear springs renew’d by flowing, Ever perfect, ever in them- Selves eternal.

AG: I guess it’s (it’s metrics are) pretty natural  – [to Student (Pat)] – Have … Read More

Studs Terkel Interviews Allen Ginsberg and Philip Glass on WFMT, Chicago 1990 – part 2

 
Philip Glass – Photograph by Allen Ginsberg – Kiev Restaurant, NYC, 1993 – Photo  c. Allen Ginsberg Estate

continuing from yesterday

ST: Resuming with Allen Ginsberg and Philip Glass, poet (and) composer working together. We heard just a piece of the very haunting “Satyagraha – the Evening Song“, earlier, that opened the Lyric Opera season. It was a pip of an opening. Critics and audience both (raved). That was three years ago… Liquid Days?  (Songs from) Liquid Days) is what?

PG: Well, it’s a collection of songs I did. In a way, it’s kind of … Read More

Studs Terkel Interviews Allen Ginsberg and Philip Glass on WFMT, Chicago, 1990 – part 1

 

Studs Terkel

Jewel Heart Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan, Philip GlassGelek Rinpoche & Allen Ginsberg, November 17, 1989

 

Philip Glass
Allen Ginsberg

Studs Terkel Interviews Allen Ginsberg and Philip Glass, 1990 We featured, a week or so back, Studs Terkel’s hilarious 1959 radio interview with Allen, Gregory Corso, and a mostly-silent Peter Orlovsky. Here’s another Terkel interview with Allen (alongside composer-collaborator, Philip Glass), this one recorded over three decades later. Ginsberg and Glass are in town (Chicago) for a benefit performance for Gelek Rinpoche‘s Jewel Heart organization (as Terkel periodically reminds his listeners), an … Read More

Campion’s Rose-Cheek’d Laura – 2

“Rose-cheek’d Laura, come/Sing thou smoothly with thy beauty’s/Silent music..” (Thomas Campion)

AG: (Basil) Bunting would probably do it [Campion’s “Rose-Cheek’d Laura“] much slower – “These dull notes we sing..” Discords need for helps to grace them” – The form here is.. what? Sapphic?  Anacrenotic? – or something like that, some Greek form

Student (Pat): No this is what he calls the English iambic (curiously enough, since it’s trochaic)

AG: ….da-data-data-data – counted by four, counted by accent..

Student (Pat): (These are) experimental.pieces from the Observations in the Art (of  English Poesie)

AG: Okay, now.  So this … Read More