Friday’s Weekly Round-Up – 340

Our good friend John Suiter’s photo-essay on Jack Kerouac’s Lowell  is a must-read. He recently complimented it with this equally-inspiring photo-essay on Jack Kerouac’s Mexico.

Speaking of Kerouac, MA*GA  in Gallarate, Italy,  presents Kerouac Beat Painting, a show of over eighty original paintings and drawings, running December 3 April 22,   more details here.

[Jack Kerouac – untitled drawing (in colored crayon) of the Crucifixion]

See two more Kerouac images here.  And here for more on Kerouac as painter.

Walt Whitman’s Brooklyn home  (99 Ryerson Street), the place where he lived when he first published Leaves of Grass in 1855, … Read More

Friday’s Weekly Round-Up – 339

[Allen Ginsberg, photographed by  Kiyohide Hori]

Never did get around to mentioning Kiyohide Hori’s photo-show of Allen and of the Howl manuscript that took place (sadly now it’s down) in Japan this past summer

More Japanese news… “the Allen Ginsberg-inspired capsule”? – Some fervid debate in the “Comments” section here – “This is everything Allen Ginsberg stood against. These guys obviously know nothing about Allen Ginsberg or what he was all about. The poor guy must be turning in his grave” – (which elicits the response: “Please enlighten us. He was against materialism, which could be related … Read More

Buddhism and The Beats (Ginsberg 1993 – I – Introduction)

A real treat this weekend – with gratitude to Robyn Brentano and students from the NYU Ethnographic Film Program – “Buddhism and the Beats.”. “In 1993, Allen Ginsberg spoke to a gathering of students of the Tibetan Buddhist monk, Lobsang Samten, about the impact of Buddhist thought and practice on himself, the Beat writers, and American culture at large”. The full hour-and-a-half tape is transcribed below (continuing tomorrow, and with the Q & A session to be featured here next weekend)

AG: Well, good evening, Rinpoche [Lobsang Samten Rinpoche] and I met very recently at the house … Read More

Friday’s Weekly Round-Up – 312

Great news! – Omnivore Recordings, and Pat Thomas, (who gave us last year the extraordinary The Last Word on First Blues), are issuing, as a two-CD package, Allen Ginsberg’s The Complete Songs Of Innocence And Experience,  is both a reissue of Allen’s original Blake release from 1969 on MGM, with the unreleased 1971 recording sessions that were to be Blake Volume 2.  The release will include, along with the two CDs, a booklet featuring several unseen photos, alongside revealing new interviews, conducted by Thomas himself, with the original session musicians. Release-date is June 23.  

 … Read More

Friday’s Weekly Round-Up – 147

From Jean-Jacques Lebel and Xavier Villetard’s Beat Generation, Kerouac, Ginsberg, Burroughs.  Allen: (“Candor ends paranoia”)   “And that is an old tradition that goes back to Whitman, who said that poets of the future should feature candor, frankness ( or “candor” is the word by Whitman) in public to bring that private candor into the public arena, to erase the schizophrenia between the way we really live and the way it’s conducted in public”. Rick Synchev’s extraordinary collection of Beat books and Beat miscellanea was auctioned off yesterday by the PBA Galleries in San Francisco, an On Read More

Spontaneous Poetics – 139

File:Pieter Bruegel the Elder - The Tower of Babel (Vienna) - Google Art Project - edited.jpg

[Pieter Brueghel the Elder (1526-1569) – Tower of Babel (1563), oil on panel, 44.8 inches x 61 inches at the Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna, Austria]  

  AG: I wanted to find out… Let’s see.. I  took over the space just as Philip Whalen was going to discourse on the languages that he spoke – and read… I butted in. I was interested in hearing.. ((I want to) switch again, just a moment)..because, I was conscious (that), when I began my sentence about (reading) (Federico Garcia) Lorca, [editor’s note, he means Rilke] that I was answering first.  [Allen turns … Read More

Spontaneous Poetics – 130 (Ginsberg & Whalen – Oriental Influences)

[R.H.Blyth(1898-1964)]

.

AG: There’s another book by (R.H.) Blyth called Senryu Notes Student: Called what? AG:  Senryu Notes – S-E-N-R-Y-U – Is that right?  [Senryu – Japanese Satirical Verses]Philip Whalen: Yeah, yeahAG: “Senryu” means what?

Philip Whalen: Senryu is the comical and obscene and..

AG: vulgar?

Philip Whalen: ..vulgar, that type of thing. Also, there’s a..

AG:  A two-volume history of haiku Philip Whalen: Yes, a two-volume history. Then there’s another book that’s called Oriental (Wit and) Humor [Oriental Humor], which is also..(a book of) senryu, and other jokes and song, and… (A)

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Spontaneous Poetics- 129 (Blyth and Haiku)

 AG: I got some complaints that last time (that) I was  getting up in the air, reading too much and boring people, (which is probably true, because my attention wavered occasionally when I was reading through the Wordsworth – most of the time I was there and present, but my attention waved too, as your attention must have –  partly out of desperation, because, actually, (with Wordsworth) I’ve sort of run out of things to teach! – except the things that I knew already, like “Tintern Abbey”, or “Intimations of Immortality..”  I would, if I had it, read through … Read More

Spontaneous Poetics -103 – The Blues Intro – 1 (Blues & Ballads)

AG: Another current aspect of communal poetics that I also wanted to touch on … is an American form, which began in improvisation, basically, I’m told, an iambic pentameter line. The rhyme scheme AAA, three rhymes in a row – so it’s a triplet, a three-line verse. Usually, the first line and the second line are repeated. The origin was in, probably, unaccompanied solo, or solo with very simple instrument(s), (it’s a musical form). Does anybody recognize the form I’m talking about?

Student: The Blues

AG: Yeah. American Blues. I’ve been studying Blues for some time now, and, not being … Read More

What The East Means To Me – Allen Ginsberg at Kyota Seika

Yesterday’s transcription of Allen’s Q & A at the Kyoto Seika University, Japan, on November 2 1988, is followed today by footage (and transcription) of the full lecture – “What the East Means To Me” – Katagiri Yuzuru is once again the accomplished interpreter/translator. Our thanks, once again, to videographer, Ken Rodgers.

AG: So.. the subject is “What the East Means To Me”. So I will give a chronological account. One of my first memories was of the Pop figure, Pop art figure, kitsch figure, or comic-strip figure of a sinister Oriental, a Chinaman, Fu Manchu. He had a long … Read More