Review/Preview (Logopoeia in Shakespeare)

screen-shot-2016-12-22-at-12-33-03-pmscreen-shot-2016-12-22-at-12-10-59-pm

[Ezra Pound’s – Literary Essays  (New Directions, 1968) & Louis Zukofsky’s A Test of Poetry (Objectivist Press, 1948 – reprinted Wesleyan University Press, 2000)]

AG: What I’ve covered so far in this course, I don’t know if you’ve noticed (because I didn’t notice till I was walking up here tonight) was..I started with some definition by (Ezra) Pound – melopoeia (music), phanopoeia.. (phanopoeia – the picture cast in the mind’s eye, melopoeia, the music of the language, and logopoeia, “the dance of intellect among words”). That’s the… so it’s the.. According to (Louis) Zukofsky, his words for the same … Read More

Comprehensive Reading

Edmund Spenser (1552-1599)

AG: Edmund Spenser is a colossus, and he’s so big that I think we’ll go around him Except, maybe, one or two, one or two little short things – the Epithalamion – a big Leviathan poem here, marriage poem. What I would suggest is that you go home and read it. It’s got a great stanza form, it’s got a great rhythmic form. So what we might do (here) is read just the first and last stanzas, just to get the stanzaic form get a taste..  Page 162 – I’m sorry..

Well, he’s very brilliant in, you … Read More

Rose-Cheek’d Laura’s Centrality

[Ezra Pound, Basil Bunting, Louis Zukofsky, Robert Duncan, Robert Creeley, William Carlos Williams and Marianne Moore]

AG: So you’ll find in the twentieth-century,  (Ezra) Pound, (Basil) Bunting, (Louis) ZukofskyRobert Duncan, some of (Robert) Creeley, all derive from this poem or from the practice of this poem. It’s sort of like the secret inner measure of their work, the kind of attempt that Campion is getting into here or the territory he’s getting into. And that was related to the idea of William Carlos Williams of finding a measure that would be an American … Read More

Campion’s Rose-Cheek’d Laura – 2

“Rose-cheek’d Laura, come/Sing thou smoothly with thy beauty’s/Silent music..” (Thomas Campion)

AG: (Basil) Bunting would probably do it [Campion’s “Rose-Cheek’d Laura“] much slower – “These dull notes we sing..” Discords need for helps to grace them” – The form here is.. what? Sapphic?  Anacrenotic? – or something like that, some Greek form

Student (Pat): No this is what he calls the English iambic (curiously enough, since it’s trochaic)

AG: ….da-data-data-data – counted by four, counted by accent..

Student (Pat): (These are) experimental.pieces from the Observations in the Art (of  English Poesie)

AG: Okay, now.  So this … Read More

Basil Bunting continued – (Bunting reads Campion)

Basil Bunting (1900-1985)
Thomas Campion (1567-1620)

A fresh tape Basil Bunting  in media res reading Thomas Campion‘s “Hark, all you ladies that do sleep!”     

HARK, all you ladies that do sleep!   The fairy-queen Proserpina Bids you awake and pity them that weep   You may do in the dark     What the day doth forbid;            Fear not the dogs that bark,     Night will have all hid. But if you let your lovers moan,   The fairy-queen Proserpina Will send abroad her fairies every one,            That shall pinch black and blue     Your white hands and fair arms   That did not kindly… Read More

John Dowland/Basil Bunting

 

John Dowland (1563-1626)

Allen Ginsberg’s January 1980 Basic Poetics class continues (in preparation for future notes on John Dowland) AG; Apparently, I have.. the “Fine Knacks For Ladies“ that you gave me the recording? – I have some  (John) Dowland around and I had that so I’ll try and bring in a… I was going to try and get Charlie (Ross – sic) to bring in a phonograph today. Were there any others on that  beside the “Fine Knacks For Ladies” ?

Student: There’s Dowland’s setting of “Weep No More Sad Fountains” on that other one.

Read More

Basil Bunting’s Lectures on Poetic Origins – 1

Basil Bunting  (1900-1985)

AG:  Some of the ideas that (Basil) Bunting was laying out, I would like to lay out here because they’re just very interesting. He was saying that, first of all, English poetry was sung up until the 17th century. All the poets wrote for singing including, of all people, John Donne! – Donne was sung. He was put to music by   a fellow named Ferrabosco of that era  (do you know anything about that?) – Well, apparently Donne was actually sung. Donne is usually taught nowadays as if he… you know.. he has one or two

Read More