Spenser – Like As A Huntsman..

Edmund Spenser (1552-1599)

AG: Okay, next – (Edmund) Spenser! – We’ll have a little bit of Spenser anyway. Page one-sixty —page one-sixty . I thought that one long sonnet, an odd sonnet he’s got there. We’ll take one sonnet anyway. Did we do this? Did we do that Sonnet 67 [Amoretti LXVII] ? on page one-sixty? – Well, it’s kind of witty and kind of interesting. Since we haven’t much of Spenser, lets just… Can somebody read that sonnet aloud? somebody who’s got the…Could you perhaps? [Allen turns to Student (Pat)] Well, Pat (sic), I think you’ve got … Read More

Edmund Spenser (Epithalamion)

AG on early English poetry continues

AG: Well, [Edmund Spenser] I think I’ll read one stanza (the first and last stanza of the Epithalamion)  just to get to swing through one long stanza, strophe, or whatever you call it.

” Ye learned sisters which have oftentimes Beene to me aydinge, others to adorne; Whom you thought worthy of your gracefull rymes, That even the greatest did not greatly scorne To heare theyr names sung in your simple layes, But joyed in theyre prayse. And when ye liste your owne mishaps to mourne, Which death, or love, or … Read More

Comprehensive Reading

Edmund Spenser (1552-1599)

AG: Edmund Spenser is a colossus, and he’s so big that I think we’ll go around him Except, maybe, one or two, one or two little short things – the Epithalamion – a big Leviathan poem here, marriage poem. What I would suggest is that you go home and read it. It’s got a great stanza form, it’s got a great rhythmic form. So what we might do (here) is read just the first and last stanzas, just to get the stanzaic form get a taste..  Page 162 – I’m sorry..

Well, he’s very brilliant in, you … Read More