Sonnet 31 of Sir Philip Sidney

[A Cornfield By Moonlight With The Evening Star c.1830.  Samuel Palmer (1805-1881)]

AG: So, there’s another interesting.. there’s a line in Sonnet 31. [of Sir Philip Sidney]  The whole thing is great and it’s a very sad sweet sonnet. It was also one of (Jack) Kerouac’s favorites of all sonnets – “With how sad steps, O Moon..” (that’s a great line!) – “With how sad steps, O Moon, thou climb’st..” page 177, Sonnet 31) –

With how sad steps, O Moon, thou climb’st the skies!

How silently, and with how wan a face!

What, may it be … Read More

More Detour on Metrics – (Longfellow)

 

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Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-1882)

AG: But (Henry Wadsworth) Longfellow, interestingly enough, (and) (Thomas) Campion, in the sixteenth Century tried out quantitative verse forms just to see if it could be done in English. Then, in the nineteenth-century, a whole raft of poets, in the mid nineteenth-century also tried out these rhythms more with an emphasis on the accentual stress part rather than on the quantitative. So there are great poems by (Algernon) Swinburne, (Alfred Lord) Tennyson (who was a fantastic prosodist, who knew all the different rhythms) – Swinburne, Tennyson, and, in America, … Read More

A Post-Thanksgiving Elizabethan Reading List

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Reading Assignments

AG: Well, okay, it’s about 9.30 almost. For next round, George Peele, page 183, George Peele – Writhe in “Hot sun, Cold fire”. Do we have any Robert Greene in our book? some Robert Greene.. Robert Southwell’s “Burning Babe” page 186..Samuel Daniel Care-Charmer Sleep“, 187…is it on there?… yeah “Care-Charmer Sleep”   Sonnet 45, page 188. Look them all over, look over Daniel – Sonnet 46 – “Authentic shall my verse in time to come..” – There is a…one other.. look over the (Thomas) Campion, which will be then in … Read More

Thursday November 24 – Thanksgiving

A Thanksgiving poem (from 1957) SONG OF THE FEAST   (for David Amram) What feast of thee, blue wild body! My relatives from the mire      wait outside thy plumage gate! The raging cock, release!              HAIL THANKSIVING! Here the fox-spoon, ye ol’ fudder bucket! An here the geese-bowl, ol’ gowdy! Yez, dare the shaker-pep an the shaker blee-ack, too! C’mon, bring o’er the radiator-soup! Now we is a eatin, now we is a eatin— Play the radio flea, ol’ fane Yez,now we is a eatin an a listening, eatin an a listening — Hey, blink, pass down the bread sink — Ah, … Read More

A Brief Detour on Metrics -1

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Allen continuing his class on Sir Philip Sidney‘s poem  [Astrophil and Stella – Sonnet 1 – “Loving in truth, and fain in verse my love to show”]

Student; So after that?

AG: Well, I don’t know. What happened to the “of”? – [”That She, dear She might take some pleasure/Of my pain”] – “of my pain”, “pleasure of my pain” – That’s one of the problems of the transcription. So we’ll substitute the “That” for the “Of”, we’ve still got six

“Pleasure might cause her read,/ reading might make her know”, no, “Pleasure/ might cause her/ read,/ … Read More

Philip Sidney – “Fool” said my Muse..”

 

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Sir Philip Sidney (1554-1586)

AG: (Sir Philip) Sidney’s Sonnets are pretty funny. Number one, particularly – 176 – a couple of pages later – Remember Anne (Waldman) the other day read, in her reading, she read a sonnet that was.. “My love is like my love and she’s like me, and her heart heart like mine, and mine…” [Editorial note – “Two Hearts – After Sir Philip Sidney”‘  –  (“She’s got my heart and I’ve got hers..”‘)] …(which) was an imitation of Astrophel and Stella, and probably the first..

The last line in … Read More

Quentin Crisp

[Allen Ginsberg with writer, raconteur, wit, Quentin Crisp, at the Kiev Restaurant, NYC, 1995]

Seventeen years since the passing of Quentin Crisp, the unforgettable Quentin Crisp. Crisperanto – The Quentin Crisp Archives – are lovingly and comprehensively curated by archivist/curator Phillip Ward.   So much extraordinary material there.  Don’t miss it. Here’s just a little sampling of the man himself, starting with his acting debut in the 1967 short, Captain Busby (based on a surreal poem by Philip O’Connor)

And Bernard Braden’s BFI interview the following year (“the year “ The Naked Civil Servant” was first published and … Read More

Michael McClure’s Mephistos

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[Michael McClure, Mephistos & Other Poems, City Lights Books, November 2016]

Michael McClure‘s new book of poems has just been released by City Lights:    “A landmark work of bio-romanticism, Mephistos and Other Poems is (McClure’s) first completely new collection in five years…. The title sequence, “Mephistos” stems from (his) ongoing “grafting” experiment, growing new poems from fragments of his older works. “Some Fringes: is a series of haiku-like nature poems, while the seventeen-part “Rose Breaths” derives from the poet’s practice of meditation. The freestanding poems grouped under the title “Being:” pay homage to many of McClure’s collaborators and fellow … Read More

Saturday November 19 (Happy Birthday, Joanne Kyger)

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[Joanne Kyger, Spring Street Center, Seattle, 2015. Photo: George Bowering]

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[ Joanne Kyger, On Time: Poems 2005 – 2014, City Lights Books, 2015]

Joanne Kyger‘s Birthday today. Here‘s an interview, following the publication of her On Time: Poems 2005-2014  from City Lights last year

The Allen Ginsberg Project has celebrated this national treasure before –  here, here,  here and here

And below, From 2012, Joanne Kyger The Poetry Project.

Happy 82nd birthday, Joanne!

Read More

Friday’s Weekly Round Up – 293

Bob Dylan, The Mann Center, Philadelphia, July 13, 2016. via Bill’s Music Blog

So Bob Dylan won’t be heading over to Sweden to pick up his Nobel Prize for Literature on December the 10th. The Swedish Academy said Wednesday that Dylan told them he “wishes he could receive the prize personally, but other commitments made it unfortunately impossible”. He is still, however, required to give a Nobel lecture some time between now and next June.

Rolling Stone announces it here, The Guardian here, here in the New York Times.

More Dylan news – and a must-read – (in … Read More