More on Metrics

[Allen Ginsberg’s classroom hand-out – “A Synopsis of Metrical Systems”]
continuing from here
MORE ON METRICS
Allen’s pedagogical insistence on quantative prosody, on the minutae of classical prosody, was something he came back to again and again with his students at Naropa  (see, for example  – one of many examples – here). In transcription, it makes, perhaps, for some somewhat tedious transcript – to hear the subtle and various distinctions he’s making, it really becomes necessary to listen closely to the audio (happily, here available). Allen does employ here a somewhat unique teaching method to lighten things up – … Read More

David Amram Remembers Jack Kerouac

[David Amram and Allen Ginsberg with Jack Kerouac and Larry Rivers at a diner –  during the making of Pull My Daisy, 1959 – Photograph by John Cohen]

Continuing our celebration of his 87th birthday

David Amram Remembers Jack Kerouac

This initial piece was originally written in 1969 for Evergreen Review, and published early in 1970 at the request of publisher Barney Rosset as an obituary for Kerouac

I used  to see Jack often at the old Five Spot in the beginning of 1957, when I was working there. I knew he was a writer, and all musicians knew … Read More

David Amram’s Birthday

[David Amram performing “Waltz After the Fall” via jackshalom]

David Amram celebrates his 87th birthday today

Recipient of the 2017 Lifetime Achievement Award from Kansas City’s Folk Alliance International.

Written and narrated by Scott Alarik, here‘s the video made specially for that occasion

and here‘s Nick Foster of Boulder, Colorado’s eTown interviewing David (from a couple of years back)

Here’s another interview  (from March of last year)

Here’s David from back in 2011, performing and talking about Kerouac

Offbeat -Collaborating With Kerouac, his memoir, was first published in 2002

His earlier memoir, Vibrations  The Read More

Friday’s Weekly Round-Up – 341

Several more images from the upcoming show of Jack Kerouac’s art at the Maga Museum in Gallarante, Italy, have been made available – here – on the Ansa web-site.

Jack Kerouac. Beat Painting’,  curated by Sandrina Bandera, Alessandro Castiglioni and Emma Zanella, is set to open December 3rd, and also includes photographs by Robert Frank and Ettore Sottsass, a project by Peter Greenaway and the video of the classic 1966 tv interview with translator Fernanda Pivano.

Did we mention? (yes, we did, it was his birthday yesterday) a new book, a biography, on the legendary Robert FrankRead More

Robert Frank’s Birthday

[Robert Frank, photographed by Allen Ginsberg, Top: March 1984, bottom: November 1994, New York City]

Robert Frank is 93 today – celebrating the legendary photographer-filmmaker (and Allen’s longtime friend)

For previous Robert Frank postings on the Allen Ginsberg Project – see  here, here, here and here

American Witness – The Art and Life of Robert Frank, the first in-depth biography of the artist, by R.J.Smith, just appeared from Da Capo Press

and don’t miss out on Don’t Blink, Laura Israel‘s riveting documentary

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Edmund Waller’s “Song” – 3

 AG: So it’s interesting to figure this [Edmund Waller’s “Song” – “Go, lovely rose”] out as sound. Now this is one of the most compelling cadences and compelling rhythms, compelling rhythms  and cadences and musics in all of English poetic lyrics…lyric. And yet, it’s one of the most mysterious as far as the count. I guess you could count .. syllables probably – “Go, lovely rose” has four, “Tell her that’s young”, “Small is the worth”, “Then die—that she” – (apparently, all the first lines are four syllables) – “Tell her that wastes her time and me” – (Tell-her-that-wastes-her-time-and-me –
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Edmund Waller’s “Song” -2

 
“Go, lovely rose” continuing from yesterday
 
AG: So what have we got?  The main thing, I guess, is ..to see if the effect.. the fact that it’s a song, and so the breath is real slow (actually, probably a slow-ish song to begin with – I would guess something like  “Go lovely rose”  (Allen attempts singing) or something like that – but “Da da-da” ..what is it? “Go, lovely rose”  – Go, love-ly rose” “Go lovely rose” Go lovely rose” (Allen tries different melodies) …whatever..  There probably was music for this. “Tell her that wastes her time and me,” –
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Edmund Waller’s “Song” – 1

 
 
Go, lovely rose!
Tell her that wastes her time and me,
That now she knows,
When I resemble her to thee,
How sweet and fair she seems to be.
 
Tell her that’s young,
And shuns to have her graces spied,
That hadst thou sprung
In deserts where no men abide,
Thou must have uncommended died.
 
Small is the worth
Of beauty from the light retired:
Bid her come forth,
Suffer herself to be desired,
And not blush so to be admired.
 
Then die—that she
The common fate of all things rare
May read in thee;
How
Read More

Allen Ginsberg 1985 “New England Today” Interview

Continuing with our on-going feature of videos from the recently-digitalized Stanford Archives – today a tv appearance from 1985, on “New England Today” (on the occasion of the publication of Collected Poems 1947-1980)  

Interviewer: My guest right now is Allen Ginsberg and he has written a number of poems and this is a big book if you like poetry, a big book of Collected Poems from 1947 to 1980, and, actually, this is your whole life in these poems, isn’t it Allen?

AG: Yes, everything I’ve written in poetry for thirty-three years, with profuse illustrations, numerous notes at the … Read More

Friday’s Weekly Round-Up – 340

Our good friend John Suiter’s photo-essay on Jack Kerouac’s Lowell  is a must-read. He recently complimented it with this equally-inspiring photo-essay on Jack Kerouac’s Mexico.

Speaking of Kerouac, MA*GA  in Gallarate, Italy,  presents Kerouac Beat Painting, a show of over eighty original paintings and drawings, running December 3 April 22,   more details here.

[Jack Kerouac – untitled drawing (in colored crayon) of the Crucifixion]

See two more Kerouac images here.  And here for more on Kerouac as painter.

Walt Whitman’s Brooklyn home  (99 Ryerson Street), the place where he lived when he first published Leaves of Grass in 1855, … Read More