Allen Ginsberg Reading in Baltimore -1969

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Allen Ginsberg at the Maryland Institute College of Art, Baltimore, November 1969

A few weeks back, we featured Allen, in 1973, reading at the Maryland Institute. Here’s another recording, from 1969, four years previously, where he presents a little mantra, a little William Blake and a substantial selection (some still in early draft) of his epic “poem of these states”, later incorporated in  “The Fall of America

The reading begins with a very brief introduction, welcoming Allen back (sic)  ( “It seems to me most appropriate because this reading comes between All Saints Day and … Read More

Friday’s Weekly Round-Up – 294

[Jean-Jacques Lebel, co-curator of the ZKM Beat Generation show, giving an inaugural speech, following the ZKM’s Director Peter Weibel, in Karlsruhe on November 25 2016.]

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William S Burroughs – from Danger Series‘ – Portrait of William S Burroughs in front of the Théâtre Odeon – Brion Gysin (Naked Lunch series, Paris October, 1959

Allen Ginsberg and Gregory Corso – video-trailer for the Beat Generation at ZKM, Karlsruhe, November 2016

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Jack Kerouac – still from video on show at Beat Generation at ZKM (Karlsruhe) – see above

Beat Generation at ZKM – Opening last weekend in Karlsruhe, Germany – Beat … Read More

December 1st – William Blake’s Mental Traveller

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Manuscript of William Blake – The Mental Traveller

THE  MENTAL TRAVELLER

I travell’d thro’ a land of men, A land of men and women too; And heard and saw such dreadful things As cold earth-wanderers never knew.

For there the Babe is born in joy That was begotten in dire woe; Just as we reap in joy the fruit Which we in bitter tears did sow.

And if the Babe is born a boy He’s given to a Woman Old, Who nails him down upon a rock, Catches his shrieks in cups of gold.

She binds iron thorns around his … Read More

The Burning Babe & Intro to The Mental Traveler

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[Holy Poet-martyr St Robert Southwell And The Burning Babe (detail), William Hart McNichols 2015]

AG: How many were not here last time?. Well, okay.. Gordon Ball’s here and wants to take some pictures so if you don’t mind flashing.. lightning-bolts.. .burning babes… The last time, we dealt with “The Burning Babe”Robert Southwell’s poem, (page) 186. I think I had assigned it so for those of you who haven’t read it, you can read it later, but the idea was that there was this weird image of a burning babe (how many were here then?), burning babe, … Read More

Sonnet 31 of Sir Philip Sidney

[A Cornfield By Moonlight With The Evening Star c.1830.  Samuel Palmer (1805-1881)]

AG: So, there’s another interesting.. there’s a line in Sonnet 31. [of Sir Philip Sidney]  The whole thing is great and it’s a very sad sweet sonnet. It was also one of (Jack) Kerouac’s favorites of all sonnets – “With how sad steps, O Moon..” (that’s a great line!) – “With how sad steps, O Moon, thou climb’st..” page 177, Sonnet 31) –

With how sad steps, O Moon, thou climb’st the skies!

How silently, and with how wan a face!

What, may it be … Read More

More Detour on Metrics – (Longfellow)

 

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Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-1882)

AG: But (Henry Wadsworth) Longfellow, interestingly enough, (and) (Thomas) Campion, in the sixteenth Century tried out quantitative verse forms just to see if it could be done in English. Then, in the nineteenth-century, a whole raft of poets, in the mid nineteenth-century also tried out these rhythms more with an emphasis on the accentual stress part rather than on the quantitative. So there are great poems by (Algernon) Swinburne, (Alfred Lord) Tennyson (who was a fantastic prosodist, who knew all the different rhythms) – Swinburne, Tennyson, and, in America, … Read More

A Post-Thanksgiving Elizabethan Reading List

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Reading Assignments

AG: Well, okay, it’s about 9.30 almost. For next round, George Peele, page 183, George Peele – Writhe in “Hot sun, Cold fire”. Do we have any Robert Greene in our book? some Robert Greene.. Robert Southwell’s “Burning Babe” page 186..Samuel Daniel Care-Charmer Sleep“, 187…is it on there?… yeah “Care-Charmer Sleep”   Sonnet 45, page 188. Look them all over, look over Daniel – Sonnet 46 – “Authentic shall my verse in time to come..” – There is a…one other.. look over the (Thomas) Campion, which will be then in … Read More

Thursday November 24 – Thanksgiving

A Thanksgiving poem (from 1957) SONG OF THE FEAST   (for David Amram) What feast of thee, blue wild body! My relatives from the mire      wait outside thy plumage gate! The raging cock, release!              HAIL THANKSIVING! Here the fox-spoon, ye ol’ fudder bucket! An here the geese-bowl, ol’ gowdy! Yez, dare the shaker-pep an the shaker blee-ack, too! C’mon, bring o’er the radiator-soup! Now we is a eatin, now we is a eatin— Play the radio flea, ol’ fane Yez,now we is a eatin an a listening, eatin an a listening — Hey, blink, pass down the bread sink — Ah, … Read More

A Brief Detour on Metrics -1

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Allen continuing his class on Sir Philip Sidney‘s poem  [Astrophil and Stella – Sonnet 1 – “Loving in truth, and fain in verse my love to show”]

Student; So after that?

AG: Well, I don’t know. What happened to the “of”? – [”That She, dear She might take some pleasure/Of my pain”] – “of my pain”, “pleasure of my pain” – That’s one of the problems of the transcription. So we’ll substitute the “That” for the “Of”, we’ve still got six

“Pleasure might cause her read,/ reading might make her know”, no, “Pleasure/ might cause her/ read,/ … Read More

Philip Sidney – “Fool” said my Muse..”

 

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Sir Philip Sidney (1554-1586)

AG: (Sir Philip) Sidney’s Sonnets are pretty funny. Number one, particularly – 176 – a couple of pages later – Remember Anne (Waldman) the other day read, in her reading, she read a sonnet that was.. “My love is like my love and she’s like me, and her heart heart like mine, and mine…” [Editorial note – “Two Hearts – After Sir Philip Sidney”‘  –  (“She’s got my heart and I’ve got hers..”‘)] …(which) was an imitation of Astrophel and Stella, and probably the first..

The last line in … Read More