WNET Levertov & Olson – Levertov

Continuing our spotlight on vintage tv, WNET’s extraordinary USA Poetry series. Today (this weekend), we continue with Denise Levertov and Charles Olson, (the Olson segment is excerpted (as most of these are) from a much larger filmed trove – in Olson’s case, a much larger filmed trove! – the extraordinary complete footage, out-takes et al, are available at the San Francisco State University Poetry Archives)

For today – part one – Denise Levertov

DL: “I always took it for granted that I was a poet. I mean, I knew from an age before I had a concept, … Read More

Friday’s Weekly Round-Up – 349

Opening tonight in New York, at the New York Public Library, You Say You Want A Revolution – Remembering the Sixties – a comprehensive exhibition, drawn from the library’s holdings, “exploring the breadth and significance of this pivotal era—from communal living and forays into expanded consciousness to tensions around race, politics, sexuality, and the environment”.  Items on display, include manuscripts from Allen, (and from Burroughs and Kerouac), “Changing of the Guards”, (an original typescript by Bob Dylan),  and notations from Timothy Leary on his LSD research, (alongside much else).

It’s Edgar Allan Poe‘s birthday today! – … Read More

More Robert Duncan – 5

Robert Duncan at Novato, California,in 1976, continues  – (see previous Duncan video from this reading/lecture – here and here)  

RD: So, here we go, we’re back.  And we’re in a very much later “Passages”, and there are two of them that came, after having two attacks of sciatica and a considerable life-depression because I’d also seen a picture of what my spine looks like (my stomach muscles are holding me up, because there’s nothing going on in there (my spine) that can be doing it at the present round, or ought to be doing it at least).  I … … Read More

More Robert Duncan – 4

Robert Duncan at Novato, California,in 1976, continues.      

RD: I want to take you through a… oh, there’s one more poem I’ll read from Bending the Bow, that was requested, and that’s the poem, “My Mother Would Be A Falconress” – People keep asking me why don’t I write good poems like that all the time? Well, this one landed on top of me, so I…. I’d never be able to do it myself is the only answer to it! I’ll read you the little Preface [“A Lammas Tiding”]  that goes with it, which is sort of a description … Read More

More Robert Duncan – 3

More Robert Duncan.   This is the second of three videos.  The first (along with a transcript) is available – here (and continues – here)

RD: How do you feel the first time that you ask for a job? Is it you that does the interview? – No, I think it’s one of these daily persons like the dream-person, like the.. and so forth… And so I have at least these three (sic) realms I’m familiar with. And then we ‘ve got testimony that people live in the realm that religious people live in. We know there’s that other … Read More

More Robert Duncan – 2

Robert Duncan at Novato, California, 1976,  continuing from – here

AG: Well, lets now for… to move onto a few more poems from this book [Bending the Bow]. It’s the first book also in which the contemplation of the meaning of our American experience emerges very strongly and it’s nice in our solemn bicentennial year (1976 (sic) – Duncan is speaking in 1976),   I haven’t got an American flag hanging in the background, But if poets came out roaring when the inequities of America appeared at full blast in that Vietnamese War, it was not because they weren’t American, it … Read More

More Robert Duncan – 1

Following on from last week’s posting on Robert Duncan, here’s another one.

From 1976, from that remarkable Bay Area Writers series that took place at Novato, California that we’ve featured  before. (See , for example, here and here, here. here and here)

RD: (I have (currently) three books) ..in print with New Directions. Bending the Bow was published in 1968, and I’ve set the date for my next volume with New Directions as being fifteen years from that publication of Bending The Bow. So that makes it 1983, and I don’t have to worry about whether … Read More

Friday’s Weekly Round-Up – 348

Reposting and restating last week’s big news – “Howl’,  a newly-assembled red vinyl  box-set will be available soon – next month – from Craft Recordings.  February 23 is slated as the release-date. Hold your breath!

A couple of weeks back,  Chris Agg uploaded a scattering of short Beat-related video-clips onto You Tube. See here (a few selected examples). We start off with Lawrence Ferlinghetti reading his prose-poem “Look Homeward, Jack – Two Correspondences”  from the book Wild Dreams of A New Beginning. (Ferlinghetti can also be seen here, reading “Constantly Rising Absurdity”, from A Coney Island of the Read More

Andrew Marvell – (The Bermudas)

[“”Where the remote Bermudas ride..”]

AG: Now Marvell is really a marvel. Andrew Marvell is really a great lyricist, and in some of the poems that we’ll pick up on now he’s written perhaps some of the best  (some) of the best lines in the English language (including Shakespeare, or up with Shakespeare). There are a couple of crystal jewel perfect-resonating, good-sounding philosophically piercing statements. Also with a kind of spectral visionary visual quality. Also with an amazing ear. So, just to taste his ear to begin with, this little thing called “The Bermudas” which is purely an imaginary Walt Read More

Andrew Marvell (via John Aubery)

[Andrew Marvell (1621-1678)]

Allen Ginsberg, in 1980, on “Basic Poetics” continues from here

AG: Well, getting on now to more serious matters, Andy Marvell Andrew Marvell – a little history on him – from John Aubery, who was a contemporary, slightly later, who wrote Lives of the Poets  (sic) has a little page about Andrew Marvell –

“He was of middling stature….”    – “He was of a middling stature, pretty strong set, roundish faced, cherry-cheeked, hazel eye, brown hair. He was in his conversation very modest, and of very few words: and though he loved wine he would never … Read More