Bobbie Louise Hawkins – 1976 – Novato

A few weeks back we featured Joanne Kyger’s reading in the Spring of 1976 for the Bay Area Writers group. Here’s the other reader on that occasion, Joanne’s then-fellow-Bolinas resident, Bobbie Louise Hawkins.  Bobbie reads some early drafts of some of her celebrated short-stories (finished drafts, the only real change being the subsitution, in some cases, of some pseudonyms for some of the characters’ original names). She also reads a number of poems

BLH: I’ll read some stories out of a book that’s called Back To Texas. It’ll be out sometime..next..early..early in the Fall..if I can find a good … Read More

Friday’s Weekly Round-Up – 313

[Allen Ginsberg reading and lecturing in Olomouc in the Czech Republic, 1993]

Allen’s new book, The Best Minds of My Generation, selections from Allen’s lectures (not to be confused with the lectures transcribed here on the Allen Ginsberg Project), “mercifully reduced to 455 pages, shorn of repetitions, student interventions and Ginsberg’s habit of beginning every sentence with “So” – (sic) – as the reviewer in the London Times would have it) continues to impress one and all.

Here’s an excerpt from Gaby Wood‘s review in London’s Daily Telegraph:

“Lovingly edited from recordings by Bill Morgan, who has … Read More

Cherry Blues

[Samuel Palmer – In A Shoreham Garden]

Cherry Blossom Season but we’re pretty certain that that colorful moment isn’t quite the kind of “cherry” that Allen’s talking about here.  (Plus, that  “Heart Failure” – ( “noisy Cherry got Heart Failure Blues”)  –  Old Age and Youth lying down together  (“Heart Failure & Cherry, Cherry in my bed”).  It’s one of the more obscure items from Allen’s  voluminous catalog, but, hey, why not.

CHERRY BLUES

Cherry in Boulder, Cherry in San Francisco too/Cherry Boulder. old Cherry San Francisco too/But Cherry Boulder trembles more than Seattle do.

Cherry in Seattle, Cherry … Read More

Granelli & Sompa and basic rhythms

[Photo: Jazz drummer, percussionist, Jerry Granelli]

Student: (Rhythm.. rhythms)

AG: But – wait a minute – but, if you did a little bit of work with Titos Sompa [Congolese-Californian teaching at Naropa] and [jazz-drummer] Jerry Granelli in analyzing, not analyzing, just learning, the basic Afric rhythms that they use ( you’ve heard them play, haven’t you?)

Student: (Sure).

AG: Have you heard Titos Sompa? – What are their names, Titos and..?

Student: Bemba..

AG: Bemba..  They are teaching basic African rhythms, (which are not very different from this kind of five.. five-beat rhythms – in fact, what they are … Read More

Allen Ginsberg at San Francisco Poetry Center, 1959

Fifty-eight years ago today, Allen read in San Francisco for Ruth Witt-Diamant at  the Poetry Center.  A reason (as if we needed one) to draw your attention to the extraordinary resources of the still active and dynamic SFSU Poetry Center.

Ruth Witt-Diamant introductory remarks:

“Our guest today is a poet for young people, of any age, But what I mean to say is that Allen Ginsberg has seemed to young people to be their voice, in many ways – and I dare say he is. Ans I think that the reason that that has seemed so is that he … Read More

More on Meters

AG: So there’s tone and pitch and then there’s the long and short vowel, and then there’s a light and heavy accent. So there’s…  Actually, Greek meters did consist in there.. that’s something interesting, these guys, particularly (Ben) Jonson, knew Greek, Greek meters consisted, as modern classicists classify them, (modern classicists classify them, Greek professors classify them), as – stress, accent and quantity (and that’s a little confusing, what’s stress and what’s accent?) – But, usually.. the terminology which is used nowadays, which has been useful for Greek… terminology used for analyzing Greek poetics (which would be useful to … Read More

Shakespeare’s Birthday

William Shakespeare’s Birthday today!  – Not quite the hoopla that surrounded last year (the 400th anniversary) – but still..   Much excitement in the Shakespeare community over the discovery a few weeks back (on the t,v; show Antiques Road Show) of a small pocket notebook of Shakespearean commentary written up by a contemporary.

See manuscript specialist, Matthew Haley‘s “trembling” discovery here  (valuing the item as upwards of 30.000 pounds ( approximately 37,500 dollars!)

Ginsberg-on-Shakespeare we’ve featured numerous times on the Allen Ginsberg Project. Try, for example,  here, here, and here, here and here, –  here (Allen thinks … Read More

Earth Day

[Edmund Muskie listens to Allen Ginsberg at the first Earth Day Celebration, Philadelphia, April 22nd, 1970]

Today, April 22nd, is Earth Day, Mother Earth Day. The original manifestation on April 22, 1970, has mushroomed into a global awareness, global activity. It is no coincidence that today also marks the one-year anniversary of the historic Paris Agreement on Climate Change (an agreement entered into by representatives of no less than one-hundred-and-ninety-five countries, and – shockingly – criticized, derided and shunned by a corrupt and ignorant American leadership). The postponement of Tuesday’s scheduled talks on a potential US withdrawal … Read More

Friday’s Weekly Round-Up – 312

Great news! – Omnivore Recordings, and Pat Thomas, (who gave us last year the extraordinary The Last Word on First Blues), are issuing, as a two-CD package, Allen Ginsberg’s The Complete Songs Of Innocence And Experience,  is both a reissue of Allen’s original Blake release from 1969 on MGM, with the unreleased 1971 recording sessions that were to be Blake Volume 2.  The release will include, along with the two CDs, a booklet featuring several unseen photos, alongside revealing new interviews, conducted by Thomas himself, with the original session musicians. Release-date is June 23.  For more … Read More

More Ben Jonson (“Queen and Huntress”)

[Artemis with a hind, better known as “Diana of Versailles”. Marble, Roman artwork, Imperial Era (1st-2nd centuries CE). Found in Italy]

AG: Okay, well, the next.. next poem,  (Ben Jonson’s) “Queen and Huntress” is total silver horns, really, a meter that’s… this is, I guess, just.. this is the same rhythm as (William) Blake’s “Tyger, Tyger, basically, this is the trochaic meter (that I was pointing out here – [Allen again points to the blackboard ] – “Tyger/Tyger”, or, “Queen And/Hunt-ress”)  – Well, “Queen, and huntress, /chaste and fair” – Got that? – bomb-a bomb-a bomb-a ba –  … Read More